13 Comments

  1. Cheryl
    June 14, 2015 @ 8:16 am

    I also have a first aid kit completed with essential oils that I can use for many medical issues as well as other things like cleaning, and pest deterrence .

    Reply

  2. George Sisk
    June 14, 2015 @ 9:06 am

    where can I purchase the Spot GPS Messenger?

    Reply

  3. Michael Andres Palmieri
    June 14, 2015 @ 9:20 am

    portabke, solar powered phone charger?

    Reply

  4. Larry
    June 14, 2015 @ 10:23 am

    It might be nice to be able to make a fire…

    Reply

    • Kurt Knutsson
      July 21, 2015 @ 8:56 pm

      You are very correct. I guess I took that one as a given. Ironically, I just got off the phone with a Polynesian fire dancer who explains that Hawaiians first learned about fire from volcanoes and only later learned how make fire on their own. Keep those waterproof matches handy!

      Reply

  5. Candace
    June 14, 2015 @ 11:34 am

    Can the survival app be downloaded to my pc ?

    Reply

    • Kurt Knutsson
      July 21, 2015 @ 8:54 pm

      One thing you may want to think about when it comes to survival apps and gear is that you will want to avoid relying on power supplies to use them. I would avoid putting them on a PC even if it’s possible. You are also likely to want to be flexible and mobile during an emergency and at times when you would lean on survival apps and gear. A PC is not as easy to keep powered when all hell breaks loose in your world.

      Reply

  6. Angela
    June 14, 2015 @ 1:10 pm

    I would add a paracord keychain or two to my gear. They are great to attach to the zippers of a backpack to have on hand. To can tie things down, together, or even fishing.

    Reply

  7. Preston North
    June 14, 2015 @ 4:41 pm

    Here are a couple of small, cheap, yet useful items to add to your list:
    Magnesium Fire Starter- $2.49 at Harbor Freight
    Some plastic wrap and small, rugged plastic bowl or cup for condensing water from damp earth
    (Dig hole until you hit damp earth. Place cup/bowl in bottom of hole. Stretch clear plastic wrap loosely over hole being careful not to knock dirt into cup/bowl. Place rocks or other small items around edge of plastic to hold it in place. Drop pebble or small, heavy object in center of plastic over cup/bowl. Heat from the sun will penetrate plastic, warming the earth in the hole. Moisture will evaporate from the earth and condense on the plastic, running down to the low point created by the pebble and drip into the cup/bowl.)
    Hope this helps.

    Reply

  8. Lisa
    June 17, 2015 @ 5:27 pm

    I have the paracord bracelet.I have one for each of my family members in our Go Bags. Plus a bunch of other items.

    Reply

  9. TexaJester
    July 4, 2015 @ 9:40 am

    I’m a long-haul truck driver. I carry a knife that has a window smashing knob and a seatbelt cutter, and a “trucker tool” that includes an axe and claw hammer built together.

    One thing I would include is a whetstone or other knife/axe sharpener.

    If room permits, a churchkey (an old-fashioned can and bottle opener – round on one end, and a sharp triangle on the other) is great. (If theworst happens, and you come upon an abandoned store or home that still has some canned goods, it’s worthwhile to be able to OPEN the cans!)

    Another is a hand-powered chain saw – it’s essentially a chainsaw “blade” that has handles on either end, and can cut through small trees with minimal effort.

    At home, or in your car, you can have an emergency candle/heater with a 5-lb coffee can (metal, not plastic!), a roll of toilet paper, and a bottle of rubbing alcohol. you pour the alcohol in the can, set the toilet paper in the alcohol, wait for the paper to absorb the alcohol, then light the toilet paper. It will burn like a wick in a hurricane lamp. This works best in a small area, like a car, but be sure to have a window cracked for frsh air. It won’t keep you warm, but it will help keep you from freezing to death. (I have used this when I was caught in a severe snowstorm and my diesel fuel gelled up [a phenomenon of diesel is that below about 15°F, it becomes a gelatine] and my motor stalled – no more heat!)

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  10. Dusty
    July 13, 2015 @ 1:09 pm

    I highly recommend John “Lofty” Wiseman’s book on survival “SAS Survival Guide”, it is available on Amazon and other book vendors. His survival kit which you make yourself is very small and realistic, including 3 ways to create fire. It is #1 in Amazon’s hiking and camping guides.

    Reply

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